Gummosis in The Arizona Summer

Posted by Sal Bracale on 9/3/2019

One common disease that occurs in Arizona, especially during the summer, when we experience extreme heat for a few weeks, is called Gummosis.

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What is Gummosis?

Gummosis is the formation of patches of a sticky, gummy substance that form on trees. It occurs when tree sap comes from a wound from the trunk or damage on the tree.

In the summer months, many customers prune their trees, which can do some damage to the trees if not properly clipped or if the tools are not entirely disinfected from previous uses. Improper care can lead to tree wounds that allow Gummosis to appear.

The majority of the customers that visit the nursery with concerns of Gummosis are usually asking about specific trees. The trees affected tend to be fruit, citrus, and mesquite trees that have already recently suffered from damage, such as bugs, disease, or severe pruning.

 
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Treating Gummosis in your Trees

The proper way to treat this first and for most is to remove any areas that look infected. So that you don't destroy or damage your tree any further, make sure you use disinfected tools for this process.

The next step is to use a systemic Fungicide, which is available at any Moon Valley Nurseries location and typically comes in a liquid form. Apply that to the tree to help with the Gummosis disease.

You want the tree to recover rapidly for aesthetics reasons as well as for the health of your tree. We strongly recommend that you began a routine care program using Super Charged Moon Juice monthly and also using Moon Dust to fertilize the tree.

These two are a winning combination when you are trying to bring your plants back to perfect health.

Think Your Trees Might have Gummosis?

If you believe that you see this problem in your yard, make sure you call, or even better yet, visit your local Moon Valley Nurseries.

Please bring pictures or samples so we can help correctly identify what is wrong with your tree and help you get your tree on the path to recovery!

Topics: landscape tips